Speed-the-Plow

This specific production does not yet have a description, but the play itself does:

Speed-the-Plow is a 1988 play by David Mamet which is a satirical dissection of the American movie business, a theme Mamet would revisit in his later films Wag the Dog (1997) and State and Main (2000).

Jack Kroll of Newsweek described Speed-the-Plow as “another tone poem by our nation’s foremost master of the language of moral epilepsy.”

The play sets its context with an epigram (not to be recited in performance) by William Makepeace Thackeray, from his novel Pendennis, contained in a frontispiece: It starts: “Which is the most reasonable, and does his duty best: he who stands aloof from the struggle of life, calmly contemplating it, or he who descends to the ground, and takes his part in the contest?” The character of Bobby Gould finds himself on both sides of this dilemma, and at times in the play he “stands aloof,” and at other times he “takes part” in life’s contest, with its moral strictures.

Cast & Crew

Cast

Unknown
Unknown
Unknown

Crew

Designer
Director
Lighting Designer

Photographs

If you have a photograph or picture that illustrates this production, please sign in to upload it, or add it to Flickr and tag it with .

Observations

If you have an interesting observation or anecdote about this production that you think others may be interested in, please sign in in order to record it here.